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Roy Moore Accuser Admits Altering Yearbook Entry

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With just four days to go before the Alabama special election to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ vacant Senate seat, a woman who accused Roy Moore of sexaul assault just admitted she altered the infamous yearbook inscription…

In an appearance on ABC’s Good Morning AmericaNelson is coached through her answer as she admits she made some ‘notes’ underneath what she claims is Moore’s entry in her 1977 yearbook – confirming what many believe is Moore’s last name, title, date, and location which appear to have been added later – constituting a forgery.

“Nelson admits she did make notes to the inscription,” ABC News tells us. “But the message was all Roy Moore.”

“Beverly, he signed your yearbook,” ABC News reporter Tom Llamas says.

“He did sign it,” she replies.

And you made some notes underneath.

Yes,” Nelson says.

Last month, Nelson’s attorney Gloria Allred refused to confirm the authenticity of the yearbook, and wouldn’t hand it over to handwriting experts unless a US Senate Committee agreed to conduct a hearing first.

Meanwhile, author and former music journalist Thomas Wictor pointed out what appeares to be different ink used on portions of Nelson’s yearbook:

Meanwhile Nelson’s stepson, Darrel Nelson, claims that his stepmother’s accusations are “one hundred percent a lie,” stating “I know for a fact that there is a lot that that woman does not tell the truth on,” Nelson claimed in an in-person interview with Breitbart News.  “Do I think that Beverly is trustworthy? No, I really don’t. Could I see her making it up? …The odds are in that favor.”

Everything from Nelson’s age when she began working at the Olde Hickory House – where she claims the assault took place, to the restaurant’s hours, to the physical layout of the location Nelson says Moore assaulted her have been called into question – aided by the testimony of former Old Hickory House employee Rhonda Ledbetter, a waitress at Olde Hickory House for almost three years from 1977-1979, along with another former employee.

In addition, two former waitresses and two former customers say they never say Moore come into the restaurant, despite Nelson’s claim that he was there “almost every night.”

  • According to Ledbetter, Olde Hickory House required employees to be 16 years old. Nelson claims she was 15 when she started.
  • According to two former employees, the dumpsters were on the side of the building. Nelson claimed that they were in the back.
  • Olde Hickory House sat right off of the four-lane highway and had a wrap-around porch with lights all around it. Nelson claimed that the surroundings were “dark and isolated.”
  • Rhonda Ledbetter, who worked at Olde Hickory House for almost 3 years, states that the earliest it closed was at 11 p.m. but she believes it was open until midnight. She is certain it did not close at 10:00 because Goodyear was next door, and employees came to eat when their shift ended at 10 p.m. Nelson claims her story occurred after the restaurant closed at 10 p.m.
  • It is unlikely that there was an entrance from the back of the parking lot, which Nelson claimed existed. Multiple sources have claimed that everyone parked on the sides of the building because there wasn’t much room behind the restaurant, according to Rhonda not enough room to turn around. Renee Schivera stated that a neighborhood backed up to the parking lot and it was adjacent to the backyards of people’s houses, so she did not see how there would have been a back entrance as it would have gone through someone’s yard.
  • Nelson claimed that Judge Roy Moore came in almost every night and sat at the counter, but former employees state that customers at the counter were served by the bartender or short order cook – not served by the waitresses and had no reason to interact with the wait staff. Additionally, two former waitresses and two former patrons state they never saw Judge Moore come into the restaurant. 

Other Moore accusers have been called out 

As Radio host Mark Levin pointed out on his show last week that there are several aspects of the case which don’t really make sense. To recap; a Washington Post reporter overheard a rumor at a Roy Moore event in Alabama about Moore sexually abusing four girls 38 years ago, then found the women, interviewed them, and the rest is history.

Levin raised the following questions:

  • How did the WaPo reporter know there were four women, who they were, and how to contact them?
  • How is it that the reporter happened to overhear a rumor about four women who don’t know each other and have never met, yet the anonymous source the WaPo reporter ran into happened to know each girl’s story and how to contact them?
  • Why hasn’t any of this been reported in Moore’s 38 years in politics? And why now – a month before an important election to fill Jeff Sessions’ senate seat?

Adding to the list of questionable circumstances is the revelation that one of Moore’s accusers, Debbie Gibson, worked as a sign language interpreter for Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden, and is actively campaigning for Moore’s Democrat opponent, Doug Jones.

As New York Times bestselling author, Attorney and Law professor James Hirsen points out:

Here’s Gibson, hard at work for Hillary:

Another Moore accuser, Leigh Corfman, has claimed “several pastors at various churches made sexual advances at her.” This 3x divorcee who has also filed for bankruptcy three times.

The Star reports:

She says that her teenage life became increasingly reckless with drinking, drugs, boyfriends, and a suicide attempt when she was 16.

As the years went on, Corfman says, she did not share her story about Moore partly because of the trouble in her life. She has had three divorces and financial problems. While living in Arizona, she and her second husband started a screen-printing business that fell into debt. They filed for bankruptcy protection three times, once in 1991 with $139,689 in unpaid claims brought by the Internal Revenue Service and other creditors, according to court records.

In 2005, Corfman paid a fine for driving a boat without lights. In 2010, she was working at a convenience store when she was charged with a misdemeanor for selling beer to a minor. The charge was dismissed, court records show.

The WaPo reporter who penned the article wrote fake check, according to an 2011 Red State report

Ms. McCrummen has a rather interesting criminal history herself, as public criminal records in multiple states stretching across 4 time zones have shown.

Ms. McCrummen’s criminal history began with North Carolina Case # 1992 CR 00654, a violation of the Article 19 – False Pretenses and Cheats section of the North Carolina Criminal Code. Ms. McCrummen was convicted of a crime punishable by up to six months of imprisonment for writing a hot check that was deemed worthless.

With the election just four days away, Beverly Nelson’s admission seems like legal ass covering. Can you imagine of Moore lost and then it emerged that she altered the yearbook?

Content originally published at iBankCoin.com

Chris G. Long

Chis Long is an award winning writer for The San Andreas Times, and various other publications. He lives in Sacramento with his wife and two children.

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